St. Luke Icon

"Christian Origins: Luke/Acts"
SCTR 24 – Spring 2007

Fr. Felix Just, S.J.
Dept. of Religious Studies, Santa Clara University

St. Luke, by Guercino

 
Instructions for Short Papers & Oral Presentations


Schedule of Presentations:

Date Paper 2: Art Analysis Paper 3: Intertextual Analysis
Wed – 4/11 Infancy Narrative: Women - Michelle Musgrove Luke 1:1–56 - Rachel Omiliak
Fri – 4/13 Infancy Narrative: JB & JC - Daniel Erlinger Luke 1:57—2:52 - Sasha Hamada
Mon – 4/16 Preparatory Events - Melissa Busmire Luke 3:1—4:13 - Karisa Karlovich
Wed – 4/18 Inaugural Sermon - Pat Nelson Luke 4:14–30 - Nicole Harris
Fri – 4/20 Galilean Ministry - Erin Urbina Luke 4:31—6:11 - David Jutovsky
Mon – 4/23 Sermon on the Plain - Ben Petrick Luke 6:12–49 - Rachel O’Harra
Wed – 4/25 Healings & Miracles - Marina Mankaryous Luke 7:1—9:50 - Pat Nelson
Fri – 4/27 Journey to Jerusalem - Ashley Charlton Luke 9:51—11:13 - Lauren Bothereau
Mon – 4/30 Demons & Exorcisms - Sarah Berg Luke 11:14—14:35 - Sandra Sosa
Wed – 5/2 Parables & Teachings - Nicole Fujino Luke 15:1—16:31 - Edgar Varela
Fri – 5/4 Economics & Justice - Rachel Omiliak Luke 17:1—19:27 - Daniel Erlinger
Mon – 5/7 Eschatology & Apocalypse - Matt Tercek Luke 19:28—21:38 - Craig Lymus
Wed – 5/9 Passion & Death - Trefor Bacon Luke 22:1—23:56 - Alyssa Paulus
Fri – 5/11 Resurrection Narratives - David Jutovsky Luke 24:1–53 - Celenne Nuñez
Mon – 5/14 Jesus & the Apostles - Alyssa Paulus Acts 1:1–26 - Sarah Berg
Wed – 5/16 Holy Spirit - Sandra Sosa Acts 2:1–41 - Nicole Fujino
Fri – 5/18 Jerusalem Community - Rachel O’Harra Acts 2:42—5:11 - Ashley Charlton
Mon – 5/21 Apostles & Deacons - Karisa Karlovich Acts 5:12—8:3 - Matt Tercek
Wed – 5/23 Saul of Tarsus & Cornelius - Celenne Nuñez Acts 8:4—12:24 - Marina Mankaryous
Fri – 5/25 Mission to the Gentiles - Sasha Hamada Acts 12:25—15:35 - Ben Petrick
Wed – 5/30 Paul’s Ministry Expands - Edgar Varela Acts 15:36—18:22 - Michelle Musgrove
Fri – 6/1 Paul’s Ministry - Lauren Bothereau Acts 18:23—20:38 - Melissa Busmire
Mon – 6/4 Conflict with Jews - Craig Lymus Acts 21:1—24:27 - Erin Urbina
Wed – 6/6 Paul’s Trials - Nicole Harris Acts 25:1—28:31 - Trefor Bacon

 


Paper #1 - First Impressions of the Gospel according to Luke (due Monday, April 9)

After having read the entire texts of both Mark's and Luke's Gospels, write a brief paper (1½ - 2 pages) in which you discuss your initial overall impressions of the Gospel according to Luke.

  • What is the overall message of this Gospel, for its original first-century readers and/or for readers today?
  • What is Luke's Christology? That is, how does Luke portray Jesus (in titles, actions, and descriptions)?
  • What does Luke say about discipleship? That is, how are people expected to act and to respond to Jesus?
  • What jumped out at you while reading this Gospel? What surprised you, either positively or negatively?
  • How does Luke compare to Mark's Gospel? What aspects of Luke are new or different, in contrast to Mark?

The above questions are intended to stimulate your thinking and deepen your critical analysis, but you do not need to answer all of them, one after another, in your paper. This is not a research paper, so you do not need to cite secondary sources or include a bibliography. However, it is a biblical paper, so you do need to refer to some specific passages from the scriptures, and include biblical references in proper format (see below).

 


Paper #2 – Biblical Analysis of Christian Artwork related to Luke/Acts

Purpose: To understand and appreciate a passage from the Gospel according to Luke or the Acts of the Apostles better by analyzing how it has been depicted in some form of art.

1) Select an episode from Luke or Acts that particularly appeals to you (one student per text per day):

  • Sign-ups will be at the start of class on Wednesday, April 11; so come early if you want a particular passage.
  • Choose a text that sparks your imagination, and for which you think you could do an in-depth creative analysis.
  • Read the text carefully in several different Bible translations (see http://catholic-resources.org/Bible/Links.htm).
  • Read the parallel texts in the other Gospels (if applicable), studying the differences in the details of each story.

2) Choose one or two works of art (painting, sculpture, woodcut, mosaic, etc.) that depict your scene especially well:

  • Browse through the online art sources linked at http://catholic-resources.org/Art/ , esp. http://www.biblical-art.com/ ;
  • or browse through some art books available in SCU’s library (see esp. Subject Headings “Christian Art and Symbolism” or “Bible Illustrations” or books with Library of Congress call numbers “N”);
  • or find another artwork reproduced in a large book, calendar, or poster (but not postcards that are too small for details).

3) Carefully compare your artwork(s) with the biblical text of the corresponding biblical text (from Luke or Acts):

  • Which portion(s) or scene(s) of the biblical text (give exact verse numbers) are depicted in the artwork?
  • Which elements of the biblical story ARE depicted in the artwork, and how?
  • Which elements of the biblical story are NOT depicted in the artwork?
  • What elements of the artwork are NOT found in the biblical narrative? Where might they have come from?
  • If a parallel story also appears in one or more of the other Gospels (check Aland’s Synopsis of the Four Gospels and http://www.utoronto.ca/religion/synopsis/), pay attention to details that appear only in Luke, not in the other Gospels.

4) Prepare an oral presentation (about 5-10 minutes) based on your analysis of the biblical text and related artwork(s):

  • make an appointment to meet with Prof. Just at least one day in advance of your presentation;
  • show the artwork to the class (provide an online link, or a printed source that can be scanned in advance);
  • briefly introduce the artist (name, country, religion, etc.) and the artwork (date, format, style of art, etc.);
  • mainly analyze the depiction from a biblical perspective, comparing it closely with the text of Luke or Acts;
  • briefly summarize how closely the artwork was influenced by Luke and how accurately it depicts the biblical text;
  • written feedback on your presentation will be provided by a few other students in our class.

5) Write a short paper (2-3 pages) that presents the results of your biblical/artistic analysis:

  • Content: do more research, as necessary, in response to the feedback you received after your oral presentation.
  • Format: please follow the same guidelines as given for the previous paper (see "Format Guidelines" below).
  • Due date: within one week of your oral presentation.
  • REFERENCES: You do not have to print out and append the pictures, but please include a short reference list at the end of your paper, listing the exact sources (URL) of the each picture you analyzed.

6) Revising and Web-Publication (optional):

  • After receiving written comments from the professor, you may revise your paper for a higher grade (unsatisfactory papers must be revised and resubmitted; papers that receive a “C” or “B” may be revised).
  • Excellent papers may be chosen for publication on the professor’s website (with your consent, of course).

 


Paper #3 – Analysis of Biblical Intertextuality (esp. using Source & Redaction Criticism)

Purpose: To understand and appreciate better a passage from the Gospel according to Luke (or the Acts of the Apostles) by analyzing how it is related to parallel passages from the other Gospels and from the Old Testament.

1) Select a section from Luke or Acts that particularly appeals to you (one student per text per day):

  • Sign-ups will be at the start of class on Wednesday, April 11; so come early if you want a particular passage.
  • Choose a specific pericope (a single complete story, about 10-25 verses) on which to focus your analysis.
  • Choose a passage that has parallels in one or more of the other Gospels (see Aland’s Synopsis of the Four Gospels) and preferably also in some OT texts (see the footnotes in your Study Bible).
  • Read your chosen text carefully in several different Bible translations (see http://catholic-resources.org/Bible/Links.htm).

2A) LUKE: Carefully compare the text of Luke with any related biblical texts from other NT and/or OT books:

  • What is the source of your pericope (Mk, Q, L)?  Are any OT texts also sources or closely related in some way?
  • Do a six-color analysis of your passage to highlight in detail all the similarities & differences in the Gospel texts.
  • Which of the similarities & differences between the Lukan text and the related passages are the most significant?
  • What do the differences, Luke’s redactional changes, tell you about the particular message of Luke?

or
2B) ACTS: Carefully compare the text of Acts with any related biblical texts from other NT and/or OT books:

  • Which passages from Luke’s Gospel are most closely related?  Which OT passages are most closely related?
  • Which other stories from earlier or later in Acts are also most closely related to your chosen text?
  • What similarities and differences do you detect between your chosen text and the related passages?
  • What do the particular emphases of your passage tell you about the message Luke is conveying here?

3) Prepare an oral presentation (about 5-10 minutes) based on your analysis of all the intertextual connections:

  • make an appointment to meet with Prof. Just at least one day in advance of your presentation;
  • briefly introduce the passage on which you are focusing, its structure or outline, and its literary context;
  • mostly analyze the connections (similarities and differences) between your text and any related NT or OT texts;
  • briefly summarize the main message Luke is conveying in your chosen passage from Luke or Acts;
  • written feedback on your presentation will be provided by a few other students in our class.

4) Write a paper (3-4 pages) that presents the results of your research:

  • Content: do more research, as necessary, to respond to the feedback you received after your oral presentation.
  • Format: please follow the same guidelines given for the previous papers (see "Format Guidelines" below).
  • Due date: within one week of your oral presentation.
  • REFERENCES: At the end of your paper (not a separate page), please include a short reference list of any sources you used, including the exact edition and translation of your Bible.

5) Revise your paper:

  • After receiving written comments from the professor, you are encouraged to revise your paper for a higher grade (unsatisfactory papers must be revised and resubmitted; papers that receive a “C” or “B” may be revised).

 


Format Guidelines for All Papers:

In order to produce a professional looking academic paper, but also to save paper, all short written exercises should be:

  • in standard essay format (brief introduction with clear thesis statement, well-structured body, very brief conclusion);
  • composed in proper academic English (please spell-check and proof-read for grammar; avoid slang & contractions!);
  • within the specified page length or word limit (if it says 1000 words, then 800 are not enough, but 1200 are too many);
  • word-processed (or typed), in any small but easily readable font (10-12 point type), with 1½ line spacing (not single or double);
  • bordered by exactly one-inch margins all around (please check your computer's settings; change the 1¼ inch default);
  • compactly identified with your name, the course number and name, and the due date (single-space this header info);
  • headed by a creative title, as well as a more descriptive sub-title, as appropriate to the assignment and topic;
  • printed on both sides of each page, if possible, to save trees (please learn how your computer and printer can do this);
  • turned in on time (at the beginning of the class session on the specified due date).

See also my separate page of Guidelines and Tips for Written Exercises and my page explaining Biblical References.

 


SCTR 24 – Peer Evaluation of Biblical Art Analyses – Spring 2007

Evaluator's Name: ___________________________________ Presenter’s Name: __________________________________

Artist’s Name: ______________________________________ Artwork Title: _____________________________________

How well did this student-scholar analyze the work of art and compare it to the corresponding text of Luke or Acts?

What was the best aspect of this student-scholar’s presentation? What did you learn from it?

What could this student-scholar do better on similar oral presentations in the future?

What else should this student-scholar address in his or her written paper based on this presentation?

 


SCTR 24 – Peer Evaluation of Biblical Intertextuality Analyses – Spring 2007

Evaluator's Name: _______________________________________ Presenter’s Name: ____________________________________

Luke/Acts Focus Text: ___________________________________ Main Parallel Text(s): ___________________________________

How well did this student-scholar present the connections between the focus text and various other biblical texts?

What was the best aspect of this student-scholar’s presentation? What did you learn from it?

What could this student-scholar do better on similar oral presentations in the future?

What else should this student-scholar address in his or her written paper based on this presentation?

 


 

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